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For most dads, caring for a vulva is an alien task. In fact, some dads may be so out of touch that they misidentify the outer region of the female genitalia as the vagina. First off, parents should want their daughter to accurately know what the parts of their genitalia are called. But Dr. Experts Weigh In. That said there are some unique hygiene protocols with baby girls. The most important tip is to wipe away from the vulva. She notes that discharge is completely normal and may arrive in concert with leakage of a cloudy fluid. It lets us know the area is open and everything that needs to flow out can. Rinsing it with warm water or gently with a baby wipe is fine.
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Back to Sexual health. Here are answers to some of the questions girls ask about their bodies. You'll probably start to notice changes from age 10 upwards, but there's no right or wrong time to start. Some people go through puberty later than others. This is normal. If you have no signs of puberty by the age of 16, see a doctor for a check-up. Find out more about girls and puberty. Yes, this is perfectly normal. Before puberty, most girls have very little discharge. After puberty, what's normal for one girl won't be normal for another.
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View research View latest news Sign up for updates. Metrics details. There are various harmful traditional practices and beliefs across the different parts of Ethiopia. Shilshalo, which is yet little known about, is one of these practices existing in Argoba , a community in Amhara National Regional State of Ethiopia. This study was conducted to explore the various features associated with the practice of Shilshalo. To address the objective of the study, qualitative approach with case study design was employed. Purposive sampling technique was used to select the participants of the study. Data were collected through interview and focus group discussion and analyzed using thematic qualitative analysis technique. This study found that Shilshalo is practiced by unmarried young boys and girls as a substitute for sexual intercourse. Shilshalo is practiced in two ways, i.

View research View latest news Sign up for updates. Metrics details. There are various harmful traditional practices and beliefs across the different parts of Ethiopia. Shilshalo, which is yet little known about, is one of these practices existing in Argoba , a community in Amhara National Regional State of Ethiopia.

This study was conducted to explore the various features associated with the practice of Shilshalo. To address the objective of the study, qualitative approach with case study design was employed.

Purposive sampling technique was used to select the participants of the study. Data were collected through interview and focus group discussion and analyzed using thematic qualitative analysis technique.

This study found that Shilshalo is practiced by unmarried young boys and girls as a substitute for sexual intercourse. Shilshalo is practiced in two ways, i. This study also indicated that most members of the Argoba community including the actors consider Shilshalo as a beneficial cultural practice, yet the most shocking story is that some teenage girls experienced unwanted pregnancy without losing their virginity.

In addition to virgin pregnancy, Shilshalo exposed girls to STIs, psycho-social problems and physical injuries. This study concluded that Shilshalo is a harmful traditional practice that severely affects the lives of girls. The overall health and social well beings of girls are affected by different saddles that came from it. It brings almost all kinds of consequences that the other harmful traditional practices such as female genital mutilation and early marriage bring.

It is also worse than the other harmful traditional practices as it poses virgin pregnancy as an additional consequence. Therefore, it is suggested that international and national organizations working on issues related to harmful traditional practice should pay due attention to Shilshalo just like what they are doing with female genital mutilation and early marriage. Peer Review reports. All social groups in the world have specific practices and beliefs which often have strong cultural underpinnings.

These can be either positive or negative. Almost all societies have positive cultural practices that are beneficial to all members. But, there are also practices which are harmful to specific groups, for example, for women and children.

It is a mere fact that HTPs are global problems affecting millions of women and girls of all culture, religion, socio-economic strata, educational levels and other diversities [ 1 ]. HTPs pose grave consequences especially on women and girls who are subject to them. Mostly, these segments of the population face physical damage, psychological problems, health complications including sexually transmitted infection, social stigmatization, denial of educational and other opportunities, inability to control their reproductive right and the like [ 2 ].

In precise terms, HTPs are used as a weapon to keep women and girls in subordinate positions by denying their health, social, economic and human rights [ 3 ]. Even though various international, regional and national legal instruments have been used to eliminate HTPs, every year millions of women and girls across the world are still the victims of different harmful traditional practices [ 4 ].

HTPs are plenty in number, but international and national agencies have given priority only to certain types of HTPs by considering their geographical coverage. Among the recognized HTPs, dowry, female infanticide, early marriage, female genital mutilation FGM and inheritance marriage are the major ones [ 3 ]. However, the authors of this article believe that geographical coverage should not be the only criterion to label HTPs as major or minor social problems.

Rather, HTPs that are practiced by minority groups should also get equal attention by the international and national agencies working on issues related to HTPs. Similarly, there are several harmful traditional practices in Ethiopia; nonetheless, the nation has given emphasis only to a limited number of HTPs by considering the geographical area covered by the HTPs. In this regard, Ethiopia has identified 12 major HTPs that need intervention. These are FGM, early marriage, uvula cutting, milk teeth extraction, marriage by abduction, food prohibition, work restriction, massaging of the abdomen of pregnant women, excessive feasts, incision, and inheritance marriage [ 5 ].

The Amhara National Regional state, the second largest state of Ethiopia, on its part identified FGM, early marriage, milk teeth extraction, and uvula cutting as the major HTPs that need special focus in the region [ 6 ].

However, Shilshalo is not yet recognized as a major HTP though it has been practiced in the region for many years. The reason why the region failed to treat it together with the other four HTPs is not because it has less adverse impact on the overall wellbeing of women; rather it is practiced only by minority groups of people, namely Argoba community.

Given this fact, it is hardly possible to get information about the overall features of Shilshalo. Therefore, this study attempted to generate a deep empirical investigation about the practices, consequences and causes of Shilshalo. The Argoba Nationality special Woreda [an autonomous administrative region or district], was founded in June With an area of 30, It is a home for about 40, people 22, Male; 17, Female. The community is entirely Islam.

Only some of the government employers, who came from other areas, are non-Islam. With respect to the economic activity, Only the rest 0. Qualitative approach was employed in this study. Among the different kinds of qualitative research designs, case study design was used since the nature of the study calls for an empirical investigation of a particular phenomenon within its real life context.

Hence, exploratory case study design was used to investigate the features of Shilshalo by taking the setting and context of Argoba community into account. The information about Shilshalo was elicited from the participants of this study through in-depth interview, key informant interview, and focus group discussion. To this effect, in-depth interviews were held with 8 girls and 6 boys and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 8 key informants comprised of religious leaders, elders, and health professionals.

The in-depth and semi-structure interview guidelines were developed and used only for this study purpose See Additional file 1. Since Shilshalo is practiced by boys and girls in the stage of puberty before marriage, the boys and girls were purposively selected based on two inclusion criteria: having the experience of Shilshalo and being in the age range of 15 and Before interviews were held with boys and girls, written consent from their parents and oral assent from them were obtained.

Each interview lasted for an hour on average. The in-depth interviews were held in Amharic. The interview focused on issues such as why and how the teenagers practiced Shilshalo and the harms it brought to them. Key informant interviews were held with two groups of purposively selected participants including two male religious leaders, two elderly women, two elderly men and two female health professionals. The first group consisted of religious leaders, and elderly women and men who could provide explanations about the socio-cultural rationales of performing the Shilshalo.

The second group involved Kebele health professionals who could clarify the potential harm of practicing Shilshalo on the wellbeing of girls. A face-to-face interview was undertaken in Amharic with each of the key informants. To validate the interview data and to get collective information, three separate focus group discussions were conducted with girls, boys and community members.

Also, three discussion guidelines were prepared for each group of discussants to properly moderate the focus group discussion See Additional file 2. All focus group discussions were moderated by the researchers, and tape recording was used to capture the reflection of both interviewees and focus group discussants.

The data were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis technique, involving the following stages. First, the audio recorded data gained from interview and focus group discussions were transcribed.

Then, the transcribed data were translated from Amharic to English. The English version of the raw data was read repeatedly to maintain familiarity See Additional file 3. Next to this, the data were sorted and arranged into different types depending on the sources of the information.

After that, detailed analysis was done with a coding process. This involved the process of organizing the material into chunks before bringing meaning to those chunks. And, it involved taking text data in categories and labeling those categories with themes. Finally, the data were interpreted and analyzed qualitatively. Trustworthiness is seen as the strength of a research.

It is used to determine whether the findings are accurate from the stand point of the researchers, the participants, or the readers of the account [ 8 ]. To ensure the trustworthiness of this qualitative study, we triangulated different data sources of information by examining evidence from the source and used it to build a coherent justification for themes.

In addition to this, we used easy and simple language and description to convey the findings. According to research participants, Shilshalo is a traditional sexual practice done by unmarried young boys and girls of the Argoba community. An old Argoba man explained this harmful traditional practice as follows.

Shilshalo is a sexual play which a young unmarried girl and a young unmarried boy perform. A girl may start earlier than a boy, at 10 or 11 or 12 years age whereas the boy may start at the age of 14 years or later. They continue playing until she or he marries. Once they become friends, they play it when they get favorable conditions. When they are ready to play, they put their bodies in contact, especially making use of their hands.

They also kiss each other, and finally the girl sleeps sticking her legs together, and the boy then brushes her thigh up to her vagina with his penis. He continues rubbing until he reaches at the state of orgasm and ejaculates his fluids there. From the above account, one can understand that the practice is done by teenagers though the starting age varies between boys and girls.

The youngsters take this play as a means of getting sexual fantasy without considering the potential consequences that result from it. They use their body parts such as lips, hands, thighs and sexual organs to practice it. Unlike the common sexual intercourse, in Shilshalo , a boy ejaculates his sperm around the area he brushed, i.

The results of this study showed that there are certain procedures followed in practicing Shilshalo. At the beginning, the boy is expected to express his love for a girl he loves.

If she accepts his request, she expresses her agreement by putting jewelry on his neck or hand. This process was well articulated by the account of the following participant. I remember how I started playing Shilshalo. When I was 13 years old, one boy approached me and asked me to be his partner.

As that time, I feared to give response, so he stayed for some time with no any answer from me. On day, while I was collecting firewood, he again asked me to be his partner. After two years of joyful time, we separated when I married another man.



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